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US Airway’s Diverse Fleet

Many of our nation's most profitable airlines stay efficient by sticking to only a few types of aircraft. For example, Southwest is one of the most profitable airlines, operating only Boeing 737's. US Airways is very different from this. Including their express fleet, they operate 17 different types of aircraft, mostly from manufacturers Airbus and Boeing.

Airbus a319: The a319 is a smaller single aisle aircraft with 124 seats. US Airways uses them mostly on short haul domestic routes. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Airbus a320: The a320 is just a little bit larger than the a319 with 150 seats (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Airbus a321: The a321 is the largest of Airbus' a320 family. It has 183 seats and is used on US Airway's busier short haul domestic routes. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Airbus a330: The a330 is US Airways's largest aircraft. It is a twin aisle jumbo jet with 293 seats on the a330-300 version and 258 seats on the a330-200 version. US uses the a330's mostly on its international flights to Europe from its bases in Philadelphia and Charlotte. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Boeing 737: The 737 is a smaller single aisle jet similar to the Airbus a320. They have about 135 seats, depending on the specific aircraft. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Boeing 757-200: The 757 is a larger single aisle jet with 193 seats. It is used on the airlines longer domestic routes. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Boeing 767-200ER: The 767 is a large twin aisle jet with 204 seats. It is used mostly on the airlines flights to Latin America and the Caribbean but is also used on some flights to Europe. (Photo from airliners.net)

Embraer E-190: The E-190 is a smaller single aisle jet with only 4 seats across. It has a total of 99 seats. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ): US Airway's Regional carriers operate the CRJ-200, CRJ-700, and CRJ-900 under the US Airways Express Titles. They have 50, 67, and 79 seats respectively. They are used on routes from hubs to smaller cities in the United States. A CRJ-900 is pictured at Charlotte. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

DeHavilland Dash 8: US Airways Regional carriers, mostly Piedmont Airlines operate the DHC-8-100, DHC-8-200, and DHC-8-300 on short haul regional flights. The 100 and 200 series hold just 37 passengers and the 300 series holds 50 passengers. The Dash 8 is arguably one of the most successful turboprops of all time. Pictured is a DHC-8-300 facing some tough crosswinds as it lands in Charlotte. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Embraer ERJ-145: The ERJ-145 is a small regional jet operated by US Airways' Express Carriers. They hold 50 passengers and are used on short haul domestic routes. (Photo from airliners.net)

Embraer E-17X: US Airways express carriers, mostly Republic Airways operate the E-170 and E-175 on short to medium haul domestic routes. They have 69 and 80 seats respectively. Pictured is an E-170. (Photo by Kyle Dunst)

Saab 340: The Saab 340 is US Airway's smallest and least used aircraft. The small twin turboprop holds just 34 passengers and is used on very short haul regional flights. (Photo from airliners.net)

1 Comment

  1. Yates Yates
    December 19, 2013    

    The 757-200 picture is wrong, it is really an Airbus A321. Maybe you should change that.

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About Kyle

I am a recent college graduate with a degree in Aviation Management. I spend my time as an airline industry professional, private pilot, blogger and world traveler. I have visited 36 countries to date and don't plan on slowing down. This blog is my way of sharing the latest developments in the airline industry as well as experiences from my world travels. All views and opinions are strictly my own.

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